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MILA KUNIS - BAD MOMS

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BAD MOMS
MILA KUNIS
with KRISTEN BELL
and KATHRYN HAHN

Hot and hilarious make for a winning combination in these bodacious beauties taking on the role of motherhood in the hit comedy film, Bad Moms, starring Mila Kunis, Christina Applegate, Kathryn Hahn and Kristen Bell.

Mila Kunis is considered one of the sexiest women in the world. The petite 5’ 4” seductress may be well-known for her sultry, raspy voice—but many may not know she speaks three languages: English, Russian, and some Spanish—or that her beautiful eyes are two different colors: her left eye is brown and her right eye is green.  

The Ukraine-born beauty proves her comedic acting chops are spot-on once again in her newest comedy. From the 14-year-old tart on the Fox television sitcom, “That ‘70s Show”, to the 2010 thriller, Black Swan, Kunis has certainly shown her talent range from comedy to serious drama, when she dropped 20 pounds and trained for seven weeks as a ballerina. That film garnered her Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild best supporting actress nominations.

Kunis married the man who she had her first on-set kiss with, fellow actor from “That ‘70s Show”, Ashton Kutcher. They gave birth to their first daughter, Wyatt, September of 2014, which made the role as Amy in Bad Moms a perfect fit for Kunis, which she began filming 16 months after entering motherhood. The couple is happily expecting their second child sometime this fall.

Kristen Bell is possibly known best as the narrator for the ever-popular hit teen television series, “Gossip Girl”. Other fans grew up loving her as the seventeen-year-old detective from the popular 2004 TV series, “Veronica Mars”. The Michigan-born girl-next-door hit the big-time as the voice character of Princess Anna in Disney’s 2013 blockbuster film, Frozen, and fans just ate her up as she sang on four songs on the movie’s soundtrack. Remember: “Do You Wanna Build A Snowman”? That’s Bell. It was during that film, in March 2013, she and husband Dax Shepard had their first child, Lincoln (whose name can be found in the film credits as “Production Baby”). Bell was also filming the hit Showtime series, “House of Lies” while she had been six months pregnant and a body double was used for most of the scenes. A year later, the couple welcomed their second daughter, Delta, and Bell returned to work three months after giving birth in order to shoot the film, The Boss, starring opposite Melissa McCarthy. And after five successful seasons, “House of Lies” just ended its series finale this year.

Voted PETA’s “World’s Sexiest Vegetarian”, Bell loves animals, often volunteering for animal-related charities. Her roots remain strong in the heartland, as she is still a diehard Red Wings (hockey) fan. Just this spring, Bell began promoting mental health awareness, opening up to the world about her own personal struggles with anxiety, depression and ADHD, of which she’s been taking medication for since childhood.

Kathryn Hahn took a hold of our hearts with her role as the amiable grief counselor, Lily Lebowski, in NBC’s prime-time drama, “Crossing Jordan”, which ran for seven years (2001-2007). But in between, the hilarious brunette hit the big screen in 2003 as Kate Hudson’s health editor roommate in the romantic comedy, How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, then there was 2004’s Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy, 2008’s Step Brothers, and then she starred opposite Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in the starkly serious 2008 drama, Revolutionary Road.

2012 saw the Cleveland, Ohio native Hahn back working in television on several different shows like: “Parks and Recreation”, with fellow funny girl, Amy Poehler for the next four years. Hahn’s comedic chops have on occasion been compared to legendary comedian, Carol Burnett.  

The talented actress who plays one of the ‘Bad Moms’ also knows personally about motherhood, having had two children with her husband, Ethan Sandler, (their son, Leonard – age 9, and daughter, Mae – age 7). Hahn gets to join her naughty trio of bad moms (Kunis, Bell and Hahn) in their hilariously raunchy hard-R motherhood comedy, Bad Moms, as they smoke, drink (and even make out with each other) all the while continually giving the bird to Applegate and her prim group of moms. 

STRIPLV: Mila, what originally drew you to the film?
KUNIS: I wanted to do something that at this point in my life I could relate to. And you know, being a mom was something so new to me, and so fresh that, it was kind of fun to play off of it, instead of going off and doing, you know, [stunt] wires for seventeen hours a day. This was actually really great. And the truth is, I got to work with six brilliant women—who are so funny, and so smart! And I think the idea of being in an ensemble cast like this was so appealing to me, because I wanted to do something with a group of people. I didn’t want to be isolated. And I wanted to do something fun. And so, this was kind of perfect.
STRIPLV: What exactly is a “bad mom”—according to the parameters of this movie?
KUNIS: A bad mom would be someone who would give their kid processed foods (smiling) within the film’s parameters. A bad mom would be someone whose kid probably would not wear organic clothing. A bad mom would be someone whose kid probably doesn’t shower every day. A bad mom would be someone whose kid watches one hour too much television. A bad mom would be someone who allows their kid to go past their bedtime, …whose kid doesn’t speak three languages, …whose kid doesn’t brush his hair every day, …whose kid sometimes has to wait for the mom to pick him up from school… I would say that’s within the parameters of the movie. 
STRIPLV: Mila, tell us about your role as the control freak character, Amy.
KUNIS: I think Amy’s arc throughout the film is so representative, I do believe, of most people in this world. I think that everybody can relate to it in some form. You strive for everything to be perfect. And you forget that the ‘messy’ of the life is what makes life happen. And I think you have a character, who at a very young age, was responsible for two living, breathing human beings. My character had a kid at 19, and a kid at 20. And so you’re faced with like: You have to hustle, and you have to make it work—and in order to make it work, it has to look like this. And that’s what you’re kind of fed at a very early age. You need a house, you need health insurance, you need a white picket fence. Your kids need to go to school, they need to be well-fed, they need to have organic food, non-processed, non-GMO, you need to drive an eco-friendly car—like everything, it’s constant. It’s oversaturation of information. It’s making us as people strive to be these impossible human beings. And I think that my character kinda has to come a little bit full circle, in regards to: she starts off on one extreme, goes through the polar opposite halfway through the film, and then finds her happy medium by the end.
STRIPLV: What was it like on set working with all these great ladies?
KUNIS: Every single woman in this film is a mom. And there’s something about that, that instantly you bond to. Like the first dinner we had as a cast, we realized we were all depressed because we were leaving our babies. And all of our babies are different ages, from K. Bells, whose youngest is I think, maybe thirteen months, to Jada’s, who is nineteen or twenty-months, and everything in between. Everybody was leaving their babies! And you found this like insane bond with these women instantly that made you love them, because everyday you’d come to work and be like: “Oh, my God! Three more days, and I can see my baby… two more days!” Everybody’s there to help each other throughout the day—Christina being one of those women. She’s brilliantly funny, smart, beautiful on the inside and outside, a great mother, a fantastic woman! I’ve known her on and off a little bit for the past maybe 10 years, I would say very loosely, like through a proof reel. And I’ve always been a huge fan of hers. And so when the name came up of: “What do you think of getting Christina Applegate?” and I was like: “Uh, if you can get her… (sarcastically) Good luck!” (laughter) But I was so excited to work with her. She’s great! She’s awesome.
STRIPLV: Kristen and Kathryn, how do you feel this film captures the everyday realities of motherhood?
BELL: This film is a wonderful, comedic portrayal of every moment moms have had, or even if you’ve just ever had a mom, when like, it’s hitting the fan, and things are going down the hill and everybody just needs a release.
HAHN: Yeah. Jon and Scott wrote a gorgeous love letter to their amazing, rad wives. And it’s such a crazy, beautiful escape, and it felt so good and cathartic to make, that I can only imagine how fun it would be to sit and watch it.
STRIPLV: So there’s already been a movement online crowning June 29th “Bad Mother’s Day.” (Bell and Hahn both gasp, elated at the news)
KUNIS: (nonchalantly) I know.
HAHN: No way!
KUNIS: (looking over to Hahn) We heard that yesterday, woman! Remember that one lady told us.
HAHN: (shocked) I don’t listen to people! (Bell’s jaw is still dropped wide open and still has her hands up and fingers wide open in gleeful surprise)
KUNIS: …when we did that weird interview thing for the premiere. 
HAHN: Oh, I thought she just said it! (pointing to STRIPLV interviewer) I thought it was her little idea.
KUNIS: I don’t know how it started, but I thought what a great way…
BELL: (grabbing both girls’ hands) Happy almost “Bad Mother’s Day,” you guys.
KUNIS: Happy Bad Mother’s Day.
HAHN: Happy Bad Mother’s… That’s so cute.
KUNIS: Such a cute way of going about it.
STRIPLV: So how would you celebrate that day?
KUNIS: Happy Bad Mother’s Day? Oh, interesting. You know how I’d celebrate it? Like I do every other Mother’s Day: wake up to homemade breakfast in bed that almost looks like pancakes. And then maybe go and get a massage, and then go to the park, and like, literally hang out with my kids the entire day.
STRIPLV: Kristen, how would you celebrate Bad Mother’s Day?
BELL: I would celebrate Bad Mother’s Day by following my instincts moment by moment. I wouldn’t plan anything, if that means we eat cereal all day. I strive to do that every day, but I often fail, because I’m preparing for the next moment. I would just live in the now.
HAHN: On Bad Mother’s Day, I would go see the film, Bad Mothers. (roars of laughter) Bad Mothers! Hah! I take that back. And it would be difficult to find that theater, because that movie doesn’t exist. On Bad Mother’s Day, I would go see the movie, Bad Moms, for sure, with a bunch of amazing, like-minded...
HAHN & BELL: (Bell joins Hahn and say together, with attitude) Bad mothers!
STRIPLV: This movie is so fun and outrageous. Tell us more about shooting your most favorite outlandish scene.
HAHN: (pointing at Kristen) Kiki as the uncut dick was pretty fun.
BELL: I’ve never… this may come as a shock, I’ve never played an uncut dick before. And I thought: ‘What do I want to do with my career?’ And immediately, I thought: ‘I want to play an uncut dick.’ I knew it instinctually. (Mila starts cracking up) And this movie was the perfect vessel.  
KUNIS: You did a wonderful job.
HAHN: Yeah, you were like Leonardo DiCaprio. She went into the wilderness as an uncut dick.
KUNIS: She went method for it.
BELL: Thank you. Thank you.
STRIPLV: What would you each say is the real message of this film?
HAHN: Just like, let it go? (laughing)
KUNIS: Weird, Kathryn, weird.
HAHN: I would say just release those expectations. Don’t be so hard on yourselves and don’t be so hard on other mamas.
BELL: And know that we’re all on your team, because we’re all in this together—whether that’s friends, or other mothers, or like, dare I say, the human race? We’re all in this together, and there are people out there that are like-minded. Check yourself that you’re not walking around awaiting judgement, because that’s part of the problem. Walk around confidently and go: “I don’t need to be judged, because I don’t care to be judged.” And I know that there are other like-minded people who want to be on my team and support this experience that I’m having here on Earth.
KUNIS & HAHN: Yeah!
STRIPLV: So what was it like for each of you to work with two males directors on a movie that’s about overworked and underappreciated moms?
KUNIS: Jon and Scott are oddly two people that are like peanut butter and jelly. They go together so well, but you take them apart and they’re missing each other. They direct so beautifully with one another. Scott is very tech heavy, and Jon is very actor heavy. And Scott wants everything to be real, and Jon wants to put in comedy. And they fit each other like little puzzle pieces. They’re unbelievable to work with. I literally said, I was like: “I’ll do anything for you—anything!” They’re so fun. They’re funny. This movie was written by them. If you read this movie, you’d be like: “Oh, a woman wrote it.” And you realize that two men wrote this movie, and after talking to them, you understand it’s just an homage to their wives. They love and respect their wives so much, and women and moms, in general. And they wrote a script, they gave it to a bunch of their female friends and were like: “Read this. Tell me what’s not right with this and then tell me your funny mom stories.” And I think that that reads on paper. They’re so great to work with. And I’m not just saying this. I love them so much, that every day, it’s such a lovely crew to be a part of.
BELL: They were sharp as tacks about female issues and what the female spirit was going through as they were trying to rear children, I feel like. They were so observant and so open to new ideas, because they wrote this script that is a love letter to their wives, so clear, yet they were always willing to take our feedback: “Well, you know when I’m with my kids…” They were just welcoming and lovely.
KUNIS: They had no ego. They wrote a script because they wanted to, not because they had something to prove. And I think that it shows. They legitimately had hundreds of women’s opinions who read the script, and interviewed women for their stories, and implemented them within the script. And I think that that shows, because they just wanted to make a really great film. So they didn’t have an ego going into it.
HAHN: Yeah, they’re both amazing listeners.
KUNIS: Yeah.
BELL: Yes.
STRIPLV: So what would you say to moms who are trying to do it all?
KUNIS: I think that you should try and you can do it all, but just know that there’s no such thing as 50/50 balance. And that’s okay. I think coming to terms with it and knowing it… Not just okay, that that just is the reality. And do as much as you can, where you can, and whatever time you can do it at, and know that that’s the most that you can do, and don’t be hard on yourself. But also know that like, it’s like a scale, like some things go up and down and ultimately somehow it all comes out even in the wash. But I think that trying to think that everything can be balanced is false hope.
HAHN: And not everything comes out in the wash, turns out.
KUNIS: Some things get lost, like socks.
HAHN: Some things are stained, yes.
KUNIS: Forever. (laughter)

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